Friday, July 28, 2017

Cities with best and worst tap water

January 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Kangen Water

Cities with best and worst tap water

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(Photo: Getty Images)

How safe is the water that flows out of your tap? The answer very much depends on where you live.

It’s now easier than ever for consumers to find out what’s in their tap water. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today released the results of a three-year investigation of municipal water supplies across the U.S.

The research and advocacy group looked at water quality tests performed by water utilities since 2004 and created an extensive database that contains info on the contaminants found in 48,000 communities in 45 states.

EWG also rated 100 big city (population over 250,000) water utilities. Below are the top and bottom results.

Cities with the best water:

  1. Arlington, TX
  2. Providence, RI
  3. Fort Worth, TX
  4. Charleston, SC
  5. Boston, MA
  6. Honolulu, HI
  7. Austin, TX
  8. Fairfax County, VA
  9. St. Louis, MO
  10. Minneapolis, MN

Cities with the worst water:

  1. Pensacola, FL
  2. Riverside, CA
  3. Las Vegas, NV
  4. Riverside County, CA
  5. Reno, NV
  6. Houston, TX
  7. Omaha, NE
  8. North Las Vegas, NV
  9. San Diego, CA
  10. Jacksonville, FL

Your city not on the list? Here is the full 100-city listing or you can search for your town by ZIP code.

If you live in one of the few areas that weren’t investigated, you can get an annual report of what’s in your public drinking water. If your water comes from a well, then see the EPA’s guidelines for those who use private wells.

The results of the investigation raise some concerns about municipal water supplies in the U.S. EWG says 316 different contaminants were found in the nation’s tap water. The group also points out that more than half of those contaminants aren’t regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Establishing more effective source water protection programs and developing enforceable government standards for contaminants would go a long way toward improving the nation’s water supply, according to the EWG.

In the meantime, no one is suggesting that you go out and start drinking bottled water (although, of course, in emergency situations it can be necessary). Experts still agree

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